POZIERES BRITISH CEMETERY

and the

POZIERES MEMORIAL

Ovillers-la-Boisselle

Somme

France

 

Pozieres Roll of Honour - Images of some of those buried and commemorated here

 

General Directions: The village of Pozieres was attacked on 23 July 1916 by the 1st Australian and 48th (South Midland) Divisions, and was taken on the following day. It was lost on 24-25 March 1918, during the great German advance, and recaptured by the 17th Division on the following 24 August.

Plot II of POZIERES BRITISH CEMETERY contains the original burials of 1916, 1917 and 1918, carried out by fighting units and field ambulances. The remaining plots were made after the Armistice when graves were brought in from the battlefields immediately surrounding the cemetery, the majority of them of soldiers who died in the Autumn of 1916, but a few represent the fighting in August 1918.

The following were among the more important burial grounds from which British graves were concentrated to Pozieres British Cemetery:-

CASUALTY CORNER CEMETERY, CONTALMAISON, on the road from Pozieres to Fricourt, used in the summer and autumn of 1916, which contained the graves of 21 Canadian soldiers, 21 Australian and 13 from the United Kingdom.

DANUBE POST CEMETERY, THIEPVAL (named from a trench and a Dressing Station), between the site of Thiepval village and Mouquet Farm. Here were buried, in the winter of 1916-17, 34 soldiers from the United Kingdom, mainly of the R.F.A.

NAB JUNCTION CEMETERY, OVILLERS-LA BOISSELLE, at the crossing of the Thiepval-Pozieres Road and "Nab Valley", in which 60 soldiers from the United Kingdom and one German prisoner were buried in the winter of 1916-17.

There are now 2,760 Commonwealth servicemen buried or commemorated in this cemetery. 1,382 of the burials are unidentified but there are special memorials to 23 casualties known or believed to be buried among them. There is also 1 German soldier buried here.

The cemetery is enclosed by the POZIERES MEMORIAL, which relates to the period of crisis in March and April 1918 when the Allied Fifth Army was driven back by overwhelming numbers across the former Somme battlefields, and the months that followed before the Advance to Victory, which began on 8 August 1918.

The Memorial commemorates over 14,000 casualties of the United Kingdom and 300 of the South African Forces who have no known grave and who died in France during the Fifth Army area retreat on the Somme from 21 March to 7 August 1918. The Corps and Regiments most largely represented are The Rifle Brigade with over 600 names, The Durham Light Infantry with approximately 600 names, the Machine Gun Corps with over 500, The Manchester Regiment with approximately 500 and The Royal Horse and Royal Field Artillery with over 400 names.

The cemetery and memorial were designed by William Harrison Cowlishaw.

 

Victoria Cross: Sergeant Claud Charles Castleton, VC, 5th Coy. Australian Machine Gun Corps. Killed in action 29/07/1916, plot IV. L. 43. Son of Thomas Charles and Edith Lucy Castleton, of 18, Wilson Rd., Lowestoft, England.

Citation: An extract from "The London Gazette", No. 29765, dated, 26th Sept., 1916, records the following:-"For most conspicuous bravery. During an attack on the enemy's trenches the infantry was temporarily driven back by the intense machine gun fire opened by the enemy. Many wounded were left in "No Man's Land" lying in shell holes. Serjt. Castleton went out twice in face of this intense fire and each time brought in a wounded man on his back. He went out a third time and was bringing in another wounded man when he was himself hit in the back and killed instantly. He set a splendid example of courage and self-sacrifice"

Casualty Details: UK 1829, Canada 219, Australia 708, Germany 1, Total Burials: 2756

 

 

 

The Pozieres Memorial: Pozieres is a village 6 kilometres north-east of the town of Albert. The Memorial encloses Pozieres British Cemetery which is a little south-west of the village on the north side of the main road, D929, from Albert to Pozieres.

On the road frontage is an open arcade terminated by small buildings and broken in the middle by the entrance and gates. Along the sides and the back, stone tablets are fixed in the stone rubble walls bearing the names of the dead grouped under their Regiments.

It should be added that, although the memorial stands in a cemetery of largely Australian graves, it does not bear any Australian names. The Australian soldiers who fell in France and whose graves are not known are commemorated on the National Memorial at Villers-Bretonneux.

The Panel Numbers quoted at the end of each entry relate to the panels dedicated to the Regiment served with. In some instances where a casualty is recorded as attached to another Regiment, his name may alternatively appear within their Regimental Panels. Please refer to the on-site Memorial Register Introduction to determine the alternative panel numbers if you do not find the name within the quoted Panels.

The POZIERES MEMORIAL relates to the period of crisis in March and April 1918 when the Allied Fifth Army was driven back by overwhelming numbers across the former Somme battlefields, and the months that followed before the Advance to Victory, which began on 8 August 1918.

The Memorial commemorates over 14,000 casualties of the United Kingdom and 300 of the South African Forces who have no known grave and who died on the Somme from 21 March to 7 August 1918. The Corps and Regiments most largely represented are The Rifle Brigade with over 600 names, The Durham Light Infantry with approximately 600 names, the Machine Gun Corps with over 500, The Manchester Regiment with approximately 500 and The Royal Horse and Royal Field Artillery with over 400 names.

The memorial encloses POZIERES BRITISH CEMETERY, Plot II of which contains original burials of 1916, 1917 and 1918, carried out by fighting units and field ambulances. The remaining plots were made after the Armistice when graves were brought in from the battlefields immediately surrounding the cemetery, the majority of them of soldiers who died in the Autumn of 1916 during the latter stages of the Battle of the Somme, but a few represent the fighting in August 1918.

There are now 2,758 Commonwealth servicemen buried or commemorated in this cemetery. 1,380 of the burials are unidentified but there are special memorials to 23 casualties known or believed to be buried among them. There is also 1 German soldier buried here.

The cemetery and memorial were designed by William Harrison Cowlishaw. Sculpture by Lawrence A. Turner. The memorial was unveiled by Sir Horace Smith-Dorrien on 4 August

1930.

 

Two images of the cemetery from the 1920's - Note the wooden grave markers stacked close to the memorial in the picture on the right

 

Victoria Cross:

 

HERBERT GEORGE COLUMBINE

Rank: Private, Service No: 50720, Date of Death: 22/03/1918, Age: 24, Regiment/Service: Machine Gun Corps (Cavalry) 9th Sqdn. , Awards: V C, Panel Reference Panel 93 and 94., Son of Mrs. Emma Columbine.

Citation: An extract from "The London Gazette," dated 30th April, 1918, records the following:- "For most conspicuous bravery and self-sacrifice displayed, when, owing to casualties, Pte. Columbine took over command of a gun and kept it firing from 9 a.m. till 1 p.m. in an isolated position with no wire in front. During this time wave after wave of the enemy failed to get up to him. Owing to his being attacked by a low-flying aeroplane the enemy at last gained a strong footing in the trench on either side. The position being untenable he ordered the two remaining men to get away, and, though being bombed from either side, kept his gun firing and inflicting tremendous losses. He was eventually killed by a bomb which blew up him and his gun. He showed throughout the highest valour, determination and self-sacrifice."

EDMUND DE WIND

Rank: Second Lieutenant, Date of Death: 21/03/1918, Age: 34, Regiment/Service: Royal Irish Rifles 15th Bn. , Awards: V C, Panel Reference Panel 74 to 76., Son of the late Arthur Hughes De Wind, C.E., and Margaret Jane De Wind, of "Kinvara", Comber, Co. Down.

Citation: An extract from "The London Gazette," dated 13th May, 1919, records the following:- "For most conspicuous bravery and self-sacrifice on the 21st March, 1918, at the Race Course Redoubt, near Grugies. For seven hours he held this most important post, and though twice wounded and practically single-handed, he maintained his position until another section could be got to his help. On two occasions, with two N.C.O.'s only, he got out on top under heavy machine gun and rifle fire, and cleared the enemy out of the trench, killing many. He continued to repel attack after attack until he was mortally wounded and collapsed. His valour, self-sacrifice and example were of the highest order."

WILFRITH ELSTOB

Rank: Lieutenant Colonel, Date of Death: 21/03/1918, Age: 29, Regiment/Service: Manchester Regiment 16th Bn. , Awards: V C, D S O, M C, Panel Reference Panel 64 to 67., Son of the Rev. Canon J. G. Elstob and Frances Alice Elstob, of "Fanshawe", Chelford, Cheshire.

Citation: An extract from the "London Gazette", dated 6th June, 1919, records the following:- "For most conspicuous bravery, devotion to duty and self-sacrifice during operations at Manchester Redoubt, near St. Quentin, on the 21st March, 1918. During the preliminary bombardment he encouraged his men in the posts in the Redoubt by frequent visits, and when repeated attacks developed controlled the defence at the points threatened, giving personal support with revolver, rifle and bombs. Single-handed he repulsed one bombing assault driving back the enemy and inflicting severe casualties. Later, when ammunition was required, he made several journeys under severe fire in order to replenish the supply. Throughout the day Lieutenant-Colonel Elstob, although twice wounded, showed the most fearless disregard of his own safety, and by his encouragement and noble example inspired his command to the fullest degree. The Manchester Redoubt was surrounded in the first wave of the enemy attack, but by means of the buried cable Lieutenant-Colonel Elstob was able to assure his Brigade Commander that "The Manchester Regiment will defend Manchester Hill to the last." Sometime after this post was overcome by vastly superior forces, and this very gallant officer was killed in the final assault, having maintained to the end the duty which he had impressed on his men - namely, "Here we fight, and here we die." He set throughout the highest example of valour, determination, endurance and fine soldierly bearing."

 

 

No. of Identified Casualties: 14,654

 

The Battle of Pozieres -

 

The Objective:

 

The Battle of Pozières was a two-week struggle for the French village of Pozières and the ridge on which it stands, during the middle stages of the 1916 Battle of the Somme. Though British divisions were involved in most phases of the fighting, Pozières is primarily remembered as an Australian battle. The fighting ended with the Allied forces in possession of the plateau north and east of the village, in a position to menace the German bastion of Thiepval from the rear. The cost had been enormous for both sides and in the words of Australian official historian Charles Bean, the Pozières ridge "is more densely sown with Australian sacrifice than any other place on earth."

 

The village of Pozières, on the Albert–Bapaume road, lies atop a ridge approximately in the centre of what was the British sector of the Somme battlefield. Close by the village is the highest point on the battlefield. Pozières was an important German defensive position, the fortified village was an outpost to the second defensive trench system which had become known to the British as the O.G. Lines. This German second line extended from beyond Mouquet Farm in the north, ran behind Pozières to the east, then south towards the Bazentin ridge and the villages of Bazentin le Petit and Longueval. On 14 July, during the Battle of Bazentin Ridge, this southern section of the German second line was captured by the British Fourth Army of Lieutenant General Sir Henry Rawlinson. The possibility of "rolling up" the German second line by turning north now presented itself if Pozières could be captured. The British Commander-in-Chief, General Sir Douglas Haig, lacked the ammunition to immediately execute another broad-front attack after 14 July. Believing that Pozières and Thiepval would become untenable for the Germans as the British continued their eastward momentum, Haig ordered Rawlinson to concentrate on the centre between High Wood and Delville Wood as well as the villages of Guillemont and Ginchy. Meanwhile the plan was to maintain the pressure and take Pozières by a "steady, methodical, step-by-step advance". Between 13 and 17 July, the Fourth Army made four, small-scale attacks against Pozières with no success and high casualties. In this period the village was subjected to a heavy bombardment and reduced to rubble. On two occasions the attacking infantry got into the trench that looped around the south and western edge of the village, known as "Pozières trench" but both times were driven out. Attempts to get east of the village by advancing up the O.G. Lines also failed.

 

The Opening of the Battle:

Rawlinson planned to deliver another attack on a broad front on 18 July involving six divisions between the Albert-Bapaume road in the north and Guillemont in the south. Haig decided to transfer responsibility for Pozières to the Reserve Army of Lieutenant General Hubert Gough which had been holding the line north of the road since shortly after the opening of the offensive on 1 July. The attack was postponed until the night of 22–23 July. To Gough's army were attached the three Australian divisions of I Anzac Corps, which had begun moving from the Armentières sector. The Australian 1st Division reached Albert on 18 July and despite the postponement of the offensive, Gough, who had a reputation as a "thruster", told the division's commander, Major General Harold Walker, "I want you to go in and attack Pozières tomorrow night". Walker, an experienced English officer who had led the division since Gallipoli, would have none of it and insisted he would attack only after adequate preparation. Consequently the attack on Pozières once more fell in line with the Fourth Army's attack on the night of 22–23 July. The plan called for the Australian 1st Division to attack Pozières from the south, advancing in three stages half an hour apart, while north of the Albert-Bapaume road, the British 48th (South Midland) Division (British X Corps) would attack the German trenches west of the village. The village and surrounding area was defended by elements of the German 117th Division. Early on 22 July the Australian 9th Battalion attempted to improve its position by advancing up the O.G. Lines towards the road but was repulsed. The preparation for the attack involved a thorough bombardment of the village and the O.G. Lines lasting several days. The bombardment included phosgene and tear gas. The infantry were scheduled to go in at 12:30 a.m. on 23 July, the attack being made by the Australian 1st and 3rd Brigades. The infantry had crept into no man's land, close behind the bombardment and when it lifted the German trenches were rushed. The first stage took the Pozières trench that ringed the village to the south.

The Battle Continues:

The second stage saw the Australians advance to the edge of the village, amongst what remained of the back gardens of the houses lining the Albert-Bapaume road. The third stage brought the line to the Albert–Bapaume road. The few survivors from the German garrison retreated to the northern edge of the village or into the O.G. Lines to the east. It was also intended that the O.G. Lines would be captured as far as the road, but here the Australians failed, partly due to strong resistance from the German defenders occupying deep dugouts and machine gun nests, and partly due to the confusion of a night attack on featureless terrain, the weeks of bombardment had reduced the ridge to a field of craters and it was virtually impossible to distinguish where a trench line had run. The failure to take the O.G. Lines made the eastern end of Pozières vulnerable and so the Australians formed a flank short of their objectives. On the western edge of the village, the Australians captured a German bunker known as "Gibraltar". During 23 July, some Australians went prospecting across the road. They captured a number of Germans and with minimal effort occupied more of the village. That night the 8th Battalion of the Australian 2nd Brigade, which had been in reserve, moved up and secured the rest of the village. The attack of the 48th Division on the German trenches west of Pozières achieved some success. However, the main attack by the Fourth Army between Pozières and Guillemont was a costly failure.

Success on the Somme came at a cost which at times seemed to surpass the cost of failure, and for the Australians, Pozières was such a case. As a consequence of being the sole British gain on 23 July, Pozières became a focus of attention for the Germans. Forming as it did a critical element of their defensive system, the German command ordered that it be retaken at all costs. Three attempts were made on 23 July but each was broken up by the British artillery or swept away by machine gun fire. Communication was as difficult for the Germans as it was for the British, and it was not until 7:00 a.m. 24 July that they received their confirmation that Pozières had been lost. With British activity now declining elsewhere on its front, the German IV Corps, on whose sector Pozières lay, was able to concentrate most of its artillery against the village and its approaches. Initially the bombardment was methodical and relentless without being intense. Known trenches and strong points, such as the "Gibraltar" bunker, received shell after shell. The western approach to the village, which led from Casualty Corner near the head of Sausage Valley, received such a concentration of shellfire that it was thereafter known as "Dead Man's Road". The German bombardment intensified on 25 July in preparation for their next counter-attack to retake the village.[9]
By this stage artillery from all around was able to join in. The German IX Corps had now taken over this sector and the commander cancelled the planned counter-attack, choosing to concentrate on the defence of the O.G. Lines which were the next objective of the British. The bombardment reached a crescendo on 26 July. By 5:00 p.m. the Australians, believing an attack was imminent, appealed for a counter-barrage. In addition to the batteries of I Anzac and British II Corps, the guns of the two neighbouring British corps also joined in. This in turn led the Germans to believe the Australians were preparing to attack and so they increased their fire yet again. It was not until midnight that the shelling subsided. At its peak, the German bombardment of Pozières was the equal of anything yet experienced on the Western Front and far surpassed the worst shelling previously endured by an Australian division. The Australian 1st Division suffered 5,285 casualties on its first tour of Pozières. When the survivors were relieved on 27 July, one observer, Sergeant E.J. Rule said:
"They looked like men who had been in Hell... drawn and haggard and so dazed that they appeared to be walking in a dream and their eyes looked glassy and starey."
 

Assaulting the O. G. Lines:


On 24 July, once Pozières had been secured, General Gough pushed for immediate moves against the O.G. Lines north and east of the village. The first task was to take the lines up to the Albert–Bapaume road; the original, unobtained objectives. Attacking in the dark, only the Australian 5th Battalion found either of the O.G. trenches and it was counter-attacked by the German 18th Reserve Division. Simultaneously on the Australian's right, the British 1st Division made an attempt to capture Munster Alley, the section of the Switch Line where it intersected the O.G. Lines. A tumultuous bombfight developed but only a small section of trench was held.
Before it was withdrawn, the Australian 1st Division had attempted to prepare a jumping-off line for the assault on the O.G. Lines. The Australian 2nd Division took over the sector on 27 July and General Gough, eager for progress, pressed for an immediate attack. The division's commander, General Gordon Legge, lacked the experience and confidence of General Walker and succumbed to pressure from Gough. On the night of 28–29 July, in conditions far less favourable than those experienced by the 1st Division on the night of 22–23 July, the 2nd Division was expected to attack. The remorseless German bombardment made effective preparations virtually impossible. The dust raised by the shelling prevented the Australian artillery observers from directing their field guns which were tasked with cutting the barbed wire entanglements. An attack by the British 23rd Division on Munster Alley dragged in the Australian 5th Brigade — the ensuing bombfight saw the British and Australian infantry expend over 15,000 grenades. The main attack went ahead, scheduled to start at 12:15 a.m. on 29 July but the Australian 7th Brigade was late in reaching its start line and its movement was detected by the German defenders; when the attack commenced, the Australians were met by a hail of machine gun fire. South of the road the 5th Brigade remained pinned down, unable to even get started. On their left, north of the road, the 7th Brigade encountered uncut wire. On the northern flank some minor progress was made by the 6th Brigade but everywhere else the attack was a failure. Including the attack and the preceding day of preparation the 2nd Division lost over 3,500 men; the 7th Brigade had to be withdrawn to reserve, so great were its losses.


General Haig was disparaging of the division's failure, telling Lieutenant General William Birdwood, the I Anzac Corps commander, "You're not fighting Bashi-Bazouks now." General Legge and the I Anzac staff resolved to do the job properly. To avoid the confusion of a night advance, the plan was to attack at 9:15 p.m. just before dark at which time the crest of the ridge and the mound of the Pozières windmill would still be discernible. However, to attack at dusk meant assembling by day which was only possible to do in the protection of trenches. Therefore a system of approach and assembly trenches had to be dug at night. Whenever the Germans detected digging parties, they mistook them for troops assembling to attack and called down a barrage. Originally the attack was to be made at dusk on 2 August but the trenches were as yet incomplete, the digging either being disrupted or the completed trenches demolished by shellfire. The attack was first postponed to 3 August and then to 4 August when the trenches were finally deemed ready. This careful planning and preparation delivered success and when the 2nd Division went in, both O.G. Lines were captured. South of and astride the Albert–Bapaume Road the O.G. Lines had been so thoroughly obliterated by prolonged shelling that the Australians ended up advancing beyond their objectives. From their vantage in the O.G. Lines on the eastern edge of the Pozières ridge, the Australians now looked over green countryside, the village of Courcelette close by and the woods around Bapaume five miles (8 km) away. The German commander ordered "At any price Hill 160, Pozières ridge must be recovered."

 


One Final Push:


By 5 August the brigades of the Australian 2nd Division were exhausted and were to be relieved by the Australian 4th Division. While the relief was underway on the night of 5–6 August the Australians were subjected to an extreme bombardment, because the salient they occupied could be shelled by the Germans from all directions, including from Thiepval which lay to the rear. On the morning of 6 August a German counter-attack tried to approach the O.G. Lines but was met by machine gun fire and forced to dig in. The bombardment continued through the day, by the end of which most of the 2nd Division had been relieved. From its twelve days in the line, the division had suffered 6,848 casualties. At 4:00 a.m. on 7 August, shortly before dawn, the Germans launched their final counter-attack. On a front of 400 yards they overran the thinly occupied O.G. Lines, catching most of the Australians in shelters in the old German dugouts and advanced towards Pozières. For the Australians, the crisis had arrived. At this moment, Lieutenant Albert Jacka, who had won the Victoria Cross at Gallipoli, emerged from a dugout where he and seven men of his platoon had been isolated, and charged the German line from the rear. His example inspired other Australians scattered across the plateau to join the action and a fierce, hand-to-hand fight developed. Jacka was badly wounded but as support arrived from the flanks, the Australians gained the advantage and most of the surviving Germans were captured. No more attempts to retake Pozières were made.

 

Reckoning:

 

Since taking over the Pozières sector, General Gough's plan had been to drive a wedge behind (east of) the German fortress of Thiepval. Having secured Pozières and the neighbouring section of the O.G. Lines, the attack now moved to the next phase; a drive north along the ridge towards the German strongpoint of Mouquet Farm which protected the rear of Thiepval. I Anzac Corps would carry the advance along the ridge while, on their left, British II Corps would keep in line, systematically reducing the Thiepval salient. Initially the task fell to the Australian 4th Division, which had already suffered 1,000 casualties resisting the final German counter-attack, but both the Australian 1st and 2nd Divisions would be called on again, followed once more by the 4th Division. When the Australians' ordeal on Pozières ridge was over in September, they were replaced by the Canadian Corps who would hold this sector for the remainder of the Somme fighting. The O.G. Lines east of the village became the Canadian start line for the Battle of Flers–Courcelette.
After the battle it became apparent that General Birdwood had lost much of his Gallipoli popularity through his failure to oppose Gough's impetuous desire for "quick results" and his "lack of thought" at Pozières. Soon after, Australian troops rejected his personal appeal for the introduction of conscription, voting against this recommendation largely because of their reluctance to see additional men subjected to the horrors of piecemeal attacks. The Australians had suffered heavy losses; they had lost as many men in the Battle for Pozières in six weeks as they had in the whole Gallipoli Campaign. One of the Official British Historians strongly praised the independent initiative shown by small sub-units of men in clearing the enemy from positions in the village, but at the same time attributed much of the severity of losses to Australian inexperience and their "reckless daring."
 

 

The Cost:


In the fighting around Pozières the 48th Division lost 2,844 casualties from 16–28 July and 2,505 more from 13 August. The 1st Australian Division lost 7,700 men, the 2nd Australian Division had 8,100 casualties and the 4th Australian Division lost 7,100 men. From 27 July – 13 August the 12th Division had 2,717 losses.

 

Battle details: Wikipedia

 

Desolation on the crest of the Pozieres Ridge at the eastern end of the village. The picture is taken from the Albert-Bapaume road looking north towards a mound which is all that remains of Pozieres windmill, captured by the 2nd Australian Division on 3 August 1916.

© IWM (E(AUS) 15)

Battle of Pozieres Ridge. The site of Pozieres, August 1916.

© IWM (Q 4078)

 

 

 

 

Battle of Pozieres Ridge 23 July - 3 September, 1916: A captured German pill box nicknamed 'Gibraltar' in the ruins of Pozieres.

© IWM (Q 1089)

Battle of Pozieres Ridge 23 July - 3 September, 1916: The badly shelled main road to Bapaume through Pozieres, showing a communication trench and broken trees.

© IWM (Q 1086)

 

 

 

 

 

Remains of a Mark I Tank on its side by the side of a road on Pozieres Ridge. The Cross is the memorial of the 2nd Australian Division. September 1917.

© IWM (Q 11605)

Memorial of the 2nd Australian Division at Pozieres, 27 August 1918.

© IWM (Q 8206)

 

 

 

 

 

The memorial to 1st Australian Division at Pozieres, 8th July 1917.

© IWM (Q 3100)

Unveiling of the Memorial to the 1st Australian Division, Pozieres, 8th July 1917. Australians presenting arms.

© IWM (Q 2598)

 

The cemetery entrance pictured in the 1920's.

Number of burials by Unit - Pozieres British Cemetery

Australian
460
  Canadian
151
Royal Warwickshire Regt
61
  Ox and Bucks Light Inf
60
Royal Field Artillery
53
  Royal Fusiliers - City of London Regt
52
Gloucestershire Regt
47
  Worcestershire Regt
33
Bedfordshire Regt
28
  Loyal North Lancs Regt
27
Royal Garrison Artillery
26
  Royal Berkshire Regt
24
Cheshire Regt
19
  Royal Irish Rifles
19
East Lancashire Regt
18
  West Yorkshire Regt
18
East Surrey Regt
15
  East Yorkshire Regt
14
Lancashire Fusiliers
12
  Rifle Brigade
12
Dorsetshire Regt
10
  Manchester Regt
10
Duke of Wellington's - West Riding Regt
9
  Gordon Highlanders
9
King's Royal Rifle Corps
9
  Sherwood Foresters - Notts & Derby Regt
9
Border Regt
8
  Cameron Highlanders
8
Machine Gun Corps (Inf)
8
  Welsh Regt
8
Durham Light Inf
7
  Essex Regt
7
Northumberland Fusiliers
7
  Royal Engineers
7
South Staffordshire Regt
7
  King's Liverpool Regt
6
Middlesex Regt
6
  Northamptonshire Regt
6
South Lancashire Regt
6
  Army Service Corps
5
Highland Light Inf
5
  Royal Army Medical Corps
5
Royal West Kent Regt - Queens Own
5
  South Wales Borderers
5
Norfolk Regt
4
  Seaforth Highlanders
4
Buffs - East Kent Regt
4
  Yorkshire Regt - Green Howards
4
Army Cyclist Corps
3
  King's Own Yorkshire Light Inf
3
Lincolnshire Regt
3
  North Staffordshire Regt
3
Royal Scots Fusiliers
3
  5th Bn London Regt - London Rifle Brigade
2
Black Watch - Royal Highlanders
2
  Duke of Cornwall's Light Inf
2
King's Own Scottish Borderers
2
  Leicestershire Regt
2
Royal Flying Corps
2
  Royal Scots - Lothian Regt
2
Royal Welsh Fusiliers
2
  Suffolk Regt
2
Wiltshire Regt
2
  York and Lancaster Regt
2
10th Hussars
1
  Cambridgeshire Regt
1
Devonshire Regt
1
  Dragoon Guards
1
Hampshire Regt
1
  Inniskilling Dragoons
1
Kings Royal Rifle Corps
1
  Prince Albert's Own Hussars
1
Identified burials
1,382
   
 
Unidentified UK burials:
1,023
   
 
Unidentified Australian burials:
259
   
 
Unidentified Canadian burials:
64
   
 
Wholly unidentified
7
   
 
Total Unidentified burials
1,353
   
 
Total burials
2,735
   Breakdown courtesy of Barry Cuttell

 

Pozieres Memorial - Number of Commemorations by Unit

Rifle Brigade
660
  Durham Light Infantry
618
Machine Gun Corps
567
  Manchester Regt
494
Royal Field Artillery
447
  Royal Irish Rifles
402
King's Royal Rifle Corps
395
  Royal Engineers
387
Northumberland Fusiliers
334
  East Lancashire Regt
333
Sherwood Foresters (Notts & Derbys Regt)
328
  Lancashire Fusiliers
320
South African Infantry
320
  King's Liverpool Regt
299
Northampton Regt
286
  Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers
278
Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regt)
275
  Royal Berkshire Regt
272
Royal West Kent Regt (Queen's Own)
252
  Royal Dublin Fusiliers
244
Queen's (Royal West Surrey Regt)
233
  Royal Scots (Lothian Regt)
230
Bedfordshire Regt
219
  London Regt (Royal Fusiliers)
208
Royal Sussex Regt
207
  Leicestershire Regt
199
Ox. & Bucks. Light Infantry
195
  Cheshire Regt
194
Essex Regt
182
  East Surrey Regt
177
Gloucestershire Regt
162
  Royal Irish Regt
162
Yorkshire Regt (The Green Howards)
162
  Lincolnshire Regt
158
Middlesex Regt
152
  West Yorkshire Regt
152
Royal Warwickshire Regt
151
  King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry
145
Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry
141
  East Yorkshire Regt
125
Worcestershire Regt
125
  Cameronians (Scottish Rifles)
124
South Lancashire Regt
122
  Highland Light Infantry
117
Buffs (East Kent Regt)
112
  Somerset Light Infantry
112
Royal Munster Fusiliers
110
  Royal Welsh Fusiliers
110
Black Watch (Royal Highlanders)
106
  Devonshire Regt
106
North Staffordshire Regt
104
  Royal Garrison Artillery
98
Wiltshire Regt
91
  Royal Irish Fusiliers
88
Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders
85
  Suffolk Regt
83
Border Regt
80
  Gordon Highlanders
77
Tank Corps
76
  Seaforth Highlanders
71
London Regt (Post Office Rifles)
70
  Machine Gun Corps (Cavalry)
67
King's Shropshire Light Infantry
61
  King's Own Scottish Borderers
59
Connaught Rangers
58
  Leinster Regt
57
Royal Naval Division
55
  Lancers (The Queen's)
50
Norfolk Regt
47
  Royal Scots Fusiliers
47
Cambridgeshire Regt
43
  Cameron Highlanders
39
Royal Army Medical Corps
38
  Hampshire Regt
37
London Regt (Queen Victoria's Rifles)
37
  London Regt (The Rangers)
37
Hertfordshire Regt
34
  Hussars
34
Hussars (King's Royal Irish)
34
  Royal Horse Artillery
34
Royal Army Service Corps
31
  Lancers (Queen's Royal )
30
Lancers (Royal Irish)
30
  London Regt (The Rifles)
30
Dorsetshire Regt
29
  Hussars (Queen Mary's Own)
29
Dragoon Guards (Carabiniers)
27
  London Regt
27
Dragoon Guards (Prince of Wales's)
25
  Queen's Own Oxfordshire Hussars
25
Dragoons (Royal Scots Greys)
21
  Hussars (The King's )
21
London Regt (Hackney)
21
  Dragoon Guards (Queen's Bays)
20
Hussars (Prince of Wales's Own Royal )
20
  Hussars (Queen's Own)
19
Dragoon Guards (Princess Charlotte of Wales's)
17
  Hussars (Queen Alexandras' Own Royal)
16
Dragoon Guards (Princess Royals )
13
  Dragoons (Inniskilling)
13
Hussars (King's Own)
13
  Hussars (Prince Albert's Own)
13
Dragoons (Royal )
11
  London Regt (London Rifle Brigade)
11
Lancers (Prince of Wales's Royal
10
  Welsh Regt
10
Army Cyclists Corps
9
  Bedfordshire Yeomanry
8
Labour Corps
8
  London Regt (PWO Civil Service Rifles)
8
London Regt (Poplar & Stepney Rifles)
8
  Dragoon Guards (Royal Irish)
7
Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regt)
7
  London Regt (Queen's Westminster Rifles )
7
Hertfordshire Regt
6
  London Regt (The Queen's)
6
Dragoon Guards (King's Royal)
5
  Army Service Corps
4
London Regt (Kensington)
4
  London Regt (London Irish Rifles)
4
Machine Gun Corps (Motors)
4
  South Wales Borderers
4
Cavalry
3
  Lancers (Duke of Cambridge's Own)
3
London Regt (Artists' Rifles)
3
  London Regt (Cyclist Bn)
3
London Regt (Finsbury Rifles)
3
  Loyal North Lancashire Regt
3
Northumberland Hussars
3
  Essex Yeomanry
2
London Regt (Blackheath & Woolwich)
2
  London Regt (1st Surrey Rifles)
2
Machine Gun Corps (Inf)
2
  Machine Gun Corps (Tanks)
2
Royal Army Ordnance Corps
2
  Royal Scots (Queens Edinburgh Rifles)
2
York & Lancaster Regt
2
  1st Life Guards
1
Grenadier Guards
1
  Lanarkshire Yeomanry
1
Leicestershire Yeomanry
1
  London Regt (St. Pancras)
1
Military Police Corps
1
  Monmouthshire Regt
1
North Somerset Yeomanry
1
  Queens Own Royal Glasgow Yeomanry
1
Reserve Regiment of Cavalry
1
  Royal Army Veterinary Corps
1
Royal Artillery
1
  Royal Wiltshire Yeomanry
1
2nd Life Guards
1
  South African Medical Corps
1
Surrey Yeomanry
1
     
Total
14,684
   Breakdown courtesy of Barry Cuttell
 

 

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