QUEANT COMMUNAL CEMETERY BRITISH EXTENSION

Queant

Pas de Calais

France

 

General Directions: Queant is a village 25 kilometres south-east of Arras. The Cemetery is on the western outskirts of the village on the road to Riencourt-les-Cagnicourt.

Queant was close behind the Hindenburg Line, at the South end of a minor defence system known as the Drocourt-Queant Line, and it was not captured by British troops until the 2nd September 1918.

On the North side of the Communal Cemetery was a German Extension of nearly 600 graves (1916-1918), now removed; and the British Extension was made by fighting units, on the far side of the German Extension, in September and October 1918.

There are now nearly 300, 1914-18 war casualties commemorated in this site. Of these, a small number are unidentified.

The cemetery covers an area of 1,011 square metres and is enclosed by a flint and rubble wall.

The cemetery was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens & George Hartley Goldsmith

Victoria Cross:

Lieutenant Samuel Lewis Honey, VC, DCM, MM, 78th Bn. Canadian Infantry (Manitoba Regiment), died of wounds 30/09/1918 aged 24, row C. 36. Son of the Rev. George E. Honey and Metta B. Honey of Lynden, Ontario.

Citation: An extract from the London Gazette, No. 31108, dated 3rd Jan., 1919, records the following: "For most conspicuous bravery during the Bourlon Wood operations, 27th September to 2nd October, 1918. On 27th September, when his company commander and all other officers of his company had become casualties, Lt. Honey took command and skilfully reorganised under very severe fire. He continued the advance with great dash and gained the objective. Then finding that his company was suffering casualties from enfilade machine-gun fire he located the machine-gun nest and rushed it single-handed, capturing the guns and ten prisoners. Subsequently he repelled four enemy counter-attacks and after dark again went out alone, and having located an enemy post, led a party which captured the post and three guns. On the 29th September he led his company against a strong enemy position with great skill and daring and continued in the succeeding days of the battle to display the same high example of valour and self-sacrifice. He died of wounds received during the last day of the attack by his battalion."

Casualty Details: UK 161, Canada 112, New Zealand 3, Total Burials: 276

 

 

 

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